• image
  • phone image

Cyber Security in Canada is “Embarrassing”


Source: iStock

While you're here, learn more about Contact Centre software with Digitcom, and click here for a Whitepaper!

 

My generation is probably the last that didn't get a personal computer until we were at least 12-years-old.

For me, that would've been around 2005.

What kind of computer did I get?

A Dell Pentium Pro, with Windows '95 OS.

When the fan was on it was like sitting in that black leather chair in front of a Maxell sound system.

I began to do my homework on the '95. It was a test of patience, to say the least, but leaving my teachers to read my chicken scratch was an even worse test of their patience. Only fair I take the brunt.

While I may have been excited at the prospect of having my own computer, being able to chat online to friends, watch pages load for what felt like hours just to see a high resolution photo, it began to feel less like a helping hand, and more like a hand tied behind my back.

Even worse, there was little to no virus protection, and you better believe I was downloading many (now severely dated-sounding) albums via Limewire, which, looking back, was less a Napster offspring service, and more a dock at which viruses could be uploaded and downloaded.

This brings me to the subject of outdated security.

Windows '95 OS + No Security = Machine Becomes Dusty Bedroom Decoration

I was fighting viruses made between '05-'08 with a computer over a decade old.

The issue of cyber security in Canada has been as ill-equipped.

In a recent Toronto Star article, Professor Jose Fernandez, a malware expert at Montreal's Polytechnique Engineering School, called Quebec "an embarrassment... There hasn't been any traction on this issue in 15 years."

To spell it out for you, Quebec, as an example, is - at best - in a similar position to 2005 me, but on a much grander scale, with much worse consequences than lost homework.

Three big cyber security mess-ups in the last few years - in which Canada played a part - that spring to mind are: Ashley Madison, The Paradise Papers, and, of course, Equifax.

In case you don't want to click any of those, or you did but kept your eyes closed (smart tactic, by the way, the results are brutal), here's a snippet: The Equifax breach affected as many as 143 million people, many of whom are Canadian.

To add to this list, the example the Star used was this:

On a Monday, workers for the municipality of Mekinac, Quebec, came into work to find their computers displaying a threat: Their security had been breached and the hackers were looking for approximately $65,000 in Bitcoin currency. In the end, the hackers received $30,000, and the municipality's computer system was down for around two weeks.

Not my worst Monday, but pretty close.

I mentioned in a past article that "your company is worth a cyber attack", just the same as a municipality. If you don't take the steps to consistently keep up with the latest malware, you'll become as wasted as a Windows '95 computer in 2005, used by a 12-year-old.

 

While you're here, learn more about Contact Centre software with Digitcom, and click here for a Whitepaper!

Experience Clever Telecom.

  Digitcom has 26 years experience working with Canada’s business community, helping to solve all their telephony challenges. If you are interested in running the most reliable phone system on the market, then contact us at 1-866-667-8357 or email us at sales@digitcom.ca.
 


ASK QUESTIONS
GET ANSWERS